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Browsing by Subject: Video

  1. An evaluation of streaming digital video resources in on- and off-campus engineering management education

    Stuart Palmer

    Computers & Education Vol. 49, No. 2 (September 2007) pp. 297–308

    A recent television documentary on the Columbia space shuttle disaster was converted to streaming digital video format for educational use by on- and off-campus students in an engineering... More

    pp. 297-308

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  2. A usability survey of a contents-based video retrieval system by combining digital video and an electronic bulletin board

    Hirohide Haga & Shigeo Kaneda

    Internet and Higher Education Vol. 8, No. 3 (2005) pp. 251–262

    This article describes the survey of the usability of a novel content-based video retrieval system. This system combines video streaming and an electronic bulletin board system (BBS). Comments... More

    pp. 251-262

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  3. Cell phone video recording feature as a language learning tool: A case study

    Nicolas A. Gromik

    Computers & Education Vol. 58, No. 1 (January 2012) pp. 223–230

    This paper reports on a case study conducted at a Japanese national university. Nine participants used the video recording feature on their cell phones to produce weekly video productions. The task... More

    pp. 223-230

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  4. Interacting at a distance: Staff and student perceptions of teaching and learning via video conferencing

    John Schiller & John Mitchell

    Australasian Journal of Educational Technology Vol. 9, No. 1 (Jan 01, 1993)

    Video conferencing is a new form of communications technology which allows students and lecturers to interact at a distance. Its use is currently being expanded within the university sector,... More

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  5. Multicampus video on demand at Monash University

    Phillip Branch & Bruce Tonkin

    Australasian Journal of Educational Technology Vol. 13, No. 2 (Jan 01, 1997)

    This paper describes research into multi-campus, video-on-demand at Monash University and its application to education. In education, video is used in a highly interactive way, for which... More

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  6. Investigating the Social Interactions of Beginning Teachers Using a Video Annotation Tool

    Joshua Ellis, Michigan Technological University, United States; Justin McFadden, University of Louisville, United States; Tasneem Anwar & Gillian Roehrig, University of Minnesota, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 15, No. 3 (September 2015) pp. 404–421

    This study examines the use of a digital video annotation tool used by beginning in-service secondary science and mathematics teachers in the Teacher Induction Network (TIN). TIN is an online... More

    pp. 404-421

  7. Development of a Closed Caption TV Corpus Retrieval System to Seek Video Scenes Containing Useful Expressions for Language Learning

    Hajime Mochizuki & Kohji Shibano, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Japan

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 1744–1752

    This paper describes the specific details of a search system to retrieve a very large closed caption corpus constructed from closed caption data from 112,000 TV programs. Our system also seeks... More

    pp. 1744-1752

  8. Impacts of Interactions in Learning-Videos: A Subjective and Objective Analysis

    Josef Wachtler, Institute for Information Systems and Computer Media - Graz University of Technology, Austria; Martin Ebner, Social Learning - Computer and Information Services - Graz University of Technology, Austria

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 1611–1619

    It is clear that a system known as selective attention is the most crucial resource for human learning (Heinze et al. 1994). Due to this fact a web based information system is developed to support ... More

    pp. 1611-1619

  9. Getting Effective Feedback In a Video Editing Class through YouTube and Facebook: A Case Study

    Daisuke Kaneko, School of Economics, Hokusei Gakuen University, Japan

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 1247–1250

    The author conducts a video editing class to develop university students’ media literacy. Feedback from others facilitates students’ development of video works. The author uploaded students’ works ... More

    pp. 1247-1250

  10. Use of video records of classroom practices to support teacher reflection in a professional learning network

    Leah Dayan, Alain Breuleux, Gyeong Mi Heo & Lei Nong, McGill University, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 980–989

    This study discusses the use of video records of classroom practices in a professional learning network (PLN) in order to support teacher reflection and professional development. Select video... More

    pp. 980-989

  11. Supporting a Flipped Classroom with a Cloud-based Video Discussion Platform and an Adaptive Learning System

    Chih-Feng Chien & Shun-Yuan Cheng, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 916–919

    Flipped classrooms have begun to be widely practiced in education in recent years. However, it has been observed that when students encounter problems while video viewing at home, they are not able... More

    pp. 916-919

  12. Intellectual Disability Pupil’s Perception about Using Technology within Special Education School in Sultanate of Oman

    Sahar El Shourbagi, sultan Qaboos University, Oman

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 232–238

    Actually, technology is more and more used among education area. In Middle East, research on technology in relation to disability is rare. This research aimed to investigate the perspective of... More

    pp. 232-238

  13. Is Anybody There? Podcasting in Online Learning

    Meg Van Baalen-Wood & Christi Boggs, University of Wyoming, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 175–181

    This paper presents a study on the effects of audio and video (i.e., podcasting) on students’ perceptions of connectedness and satisfaction with online learning. We will argue that while podcasting... More

    pp. 175-181

  14. Using Novel Video Indexing and Data Analytics Tool to Enhance Interactions in e-Learning

    Shuangbao Wang, University of Maryland, United States; William Kelly, Metonymy Corporation, United States; Jie Zhang, Academy of Science, China

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1919–1927

    In this paper, we present a novel system - inVideo for video data analytics, and its use in learning analytics as the field strives towards new cultures of learning in the digital realm involving... More

    pp. 1919-1927

  15. Students’ Attitude Toward Watching Instructional Video via Mobile Device

    Alaa Zeyab, University of Northern Colorado, United States; Mia Williams, university of Northern Colorado, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1665–1671

    This paper investigates how students use mobile devices to seek out additional information or instruction outside of class materials by watching instructional videos with the aim of increasing... More

    pp. 1665-1671

  16. The Benefits and Impact of Annotated Video Feedback for Clinical Supervision

    Georgianna Ravenna, CalStateTEACH at California State University, Fullerton, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1574–1585

    This is the first section of a two-part study involving a small group of teacher credential candidates. The first part of the study examines teacher candidates’ preferences for the use of annotated... More

    pp. 1574-1585

  17. Agency Construction Through Agentic Learning via Mobile Technology

    Yang Liu & Dongping Zheng, University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States; Daniel Holden, Department of Second Language Studies, United States; Peiyu Wang, Renmin University of China, China

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1520–1523

    This paper delineates the relationship between play, language learning, and agency through mobile-assisted gameplay. Following Thibault (2004), play involves a de-location of activities from their ... More

    pp. 1520-1523

  18. Engaging the NetGeneration Through the Use of Simulated Games in Both Traditional and E-Learning Settings

    Stephen Hammel, Nina Sarkar & Christina Manzo, Queensborough Community College, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1488–1492

    Today’s students are digital natives and have grown up with computer technology and video games. Their constant exposure to the Internet and other digital media shapes and influences how they... More

    pp. 1488-1492

  19. Predicting the Adoption of Video Podcast in Online Health Education: Using a Modified Version of the Technology Acceptance Model (Health Education Technology Adoption Model HEDTAM)

    Sherry Grover, Destiny Group, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1100–1104

    Online Health Education curriculum includes teaching courses to adult learners that pertain to chronic illnesses. With further investigation on the topic in this preliminary study, the researcher... More

    pp. 1100-1104

  20. Development of the Virtual Physical Laboratory – Simple Pendulum

    Yuhur Chou, Tungnan University, Taiwan; Hsinyih Shyu, Tamkang University, Taiwan

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1074–1078

    MOOCs are discussed very often in these years and are considered as the most innovation teaching method for higher education in the future. There are many researchers think that the revolution of... More

    pp. 1074-1078