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Effects of Violating Screen Design Principles of Balance, Unity, and Focus on Recall Learning, Study Time, and Completion Rates
Article

, , University of Alberta, Canada

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Volume 8, Number 1, ISSN 1055-8896 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

The purpose of this experimental research study was to determine if artistic screens (screens that employ accepted principles of visual design) influence the learning process. The independent variable was screen design; the dependent variables were recall learning, lesson completion time, and completion rate. Fifty-two adult subjects from a research university in Western Canada participated in this study. Comparisons of the two groups showed that there was no difference in achievement scores between subjects who used the lesson with good design principles and those who used the lesson with poor design principles. However, it was found that subjects who used the lesson with good design principles completed the lesson in less time (21%) and had a higher completion rate (74% vs. 45%) than those who used the lesson with poor design principles. Possible explanations focused on automaticity of control processes while learning and complexity of cognitive processing as a function of complexity of visuals.

Citation

Szabo, M. & Kanuka, H. (1999). Effects of Violating Screen Design Principles of Balance, Unity, and Focus on Recall Learning, Study Time, and Completion Rates. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 8(1), 23-42. Charlottesville, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 17, 2019 from .

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