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The Relationship Between Learning Styles and Student Learning in Online Courses
PROCEEDINGS

, Wilkes University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-84-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Just as learning styles affect how students learn in traditional face-to-face courses, learning styles also influence student learning in online courses. This paper reviews multiple research studies that have addressed learning styles and student learning in online courses. Some studies have found a relationship between learning styles and student learning, while others failed to detect a significant relationship. Since different researchers have used different learning style inventories as research instruments, comparisons can not always be clearly drawn, yet each of these studies constitutes a contribution to the field of learning styles and online learning. Conflicting results and a need for a clearer understanding of the relationship between learning styles and student learning in online courses point to a need for future research in this area. An understanding of the relationship between learning styles and student learning in online courses will assist those involved in instructional design and delivery in effectively meeting the needs of all students.

Citation

Featro, S. (2011). The Relationship Between Learning Styles and Student Learning in Online Courses. In M. Koehler & P. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2011--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 266-273). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 1, 2020 from .

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