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To Group or Not to Group: A Question for Distance Learning
PROCEEDINGS

, , , OISE/University of Toronto, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Orlando, FL USA ISBN 978-1-880094-60-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The online environment lends itself to learner collaboration, both in large or small groups (Kearsley, Lynch, & Wizer, 1995). It is built on the principles of social constructivist learning (Muilenburg & Berge, 2000) which suggest that learning takes place through discussion and social interaction of students engaged with and manipulating the problem at hand (Driscoll, 2000). However, other research suggests that group learning may not be attractive to some students. Berg (2003) discovered an inconsistency between teacher and student attitudes toward group projects. Considering the widely recognized benefits of group work to learning outcome, it is understandable why administrators would think it is important to include it in the curriculum. However, if group work is so effective, why do so many distance learners dislike this method of learning?

Citation

Robertson, O., Peters, V. & Hewitt, J. (2006). To Group or Not to Group: A Question for Distance Learning. In E. Pearson & P. Bohman (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2006--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 460-467). Orlando, FL USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 7, 2020 from .

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