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Analyzing the Development of Science and Mathematics Teachers’ Maker-Centered Philosophy and Instructional Practices

, The University of Texas, Austin, United States ; , The University of Hawai’i System, United States ; , Kennesaw State University, United States

CITE Journal Volume 21, Number 1, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Making is an iterative process of designing, building, tinkering, and problem-solving, resulting in the creation of personally meaningful artifacts. Fueled by recent developments in affordable, safe, and easy to use digital fabrication technologies, making has been embraced by educators the world over. While educational scholarship is developing an increasingly complex understanding of the practices and pedagogies needed to support making in the classroom, there has been limited research associated with the preparation of teachers and their development of maker-centered instructional practices. In this embedded case study, the authors examined artifacts produced by 13 secondary preservice and in-service science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) classroom teachers engaged in long-term maker professional development as part of a microcredentialing program. Analysis of these artifacts uncovered an array of motivations for engaging with classroom making, illustrated how participants implemented their maker philosophies in secondary STEM classrooms, and suggested the need for additional research on and models of maker-centered programs in teacher preparation.

Citation

Rodriguez, S., Smith, S. & Harron, J. (2021). Analyzing the Development of Science and Mathematics Teachers’ Maker-Centered Philosophy and Instructional Practices. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 21(1), 97-125. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved June 13, 2021 from .