You are here:

The Use of Instructional Simulations to Support Classroom Teaching: A Crisis Communication Case Study
Article

, University of Evansville, United States ; , None, United States

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Volume 15, Number 4, ISSN 1055-8896 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate how exposure to classroom instruction affected the use of a computer simulation that was designed to provide students an opportunity to apply material presented in class. The study involved an analysis of a computer-based crisis communication case study designed for a college-level public relations course, comparing students taking the course with students having no public relations exposure. The results showed that while the total scores were almost identical for both groups, there were differences in the types of questions the groups tended to score higher on. Also, there were differences in how each group navigated through the simulation. Differences in learning styles had a greater impact on those without public relations exposure than those taking the public relations class. The results indicate that instructional simulation designers need to account for the influence that classroom instruction will have on student performance during these types of simulations.

Citation

Shifflet, M. & Brown, J. (2006). The Use of Instructional Simulations to Support Classroom Teaching: A Crisis Communication Case Study. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 15(4), 377-395. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 13, 2019 from .

Keywords

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References