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The Status of Middle and High School Instruction: Examining Professional Development, Social Desirability, and Teacher Readiness for Blended Pedagogy in the Southeastern United States
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, Mansfield University, United States ; , , Thrivist, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, TX, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-27-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Digital and technological resources have allowed K-12 educators to implement a blended learning approach to their secondary instruction. Research shows that educators desire ongoing PD support in blended learning but the pedagogical understandings are vague and often clouded by the social desirability pressures to be a blended learning school.

This study investigates how existing PD affects traditional secondary teachers’ instructional pedagogy in blended learning, measures if existing PD opportunities make an impact on blended implementation, and identifies specific areas where blended pedagogy is lacking among teachers. The results also identify gaps between self-identified blended teachers and those who actually implement blended pedagogy into their instructional systems. Finally, the level of fidelity in which blended learning is implemented in the secondary school settings is clarified for authenticity in practice.

Citation

Parks, R., Oliver, W. & Carson, E. (2017). The Status of Middle and High School Instruction: Examining Professional Development, Social Desirability, and Teacher Readiness for Blended Pedagogy in the Southeastern United States. In P. Resta & S. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2236-2242). Austin, TX, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 10, 2019 from .

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