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Social-Relational Risk Factors for Predicting Elder Physical Abuse: An Ecological Bi-Focal Model
ARTICLE

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IJAHD Volume 75, Number 1, ISSN 0091-4150

Abstract

Annually in the United States, 1 to 5 million older adults, 65 and above, are physically or sexually injured or mistreated by their caregivers in family settings. This study examined the prevalence and risk factors involved in elder physical abuse by adult child caregivers, moving from the immediate elderly parent/adult child relationship context to more distal social support contexts, utilizing a subsample of 203 elderly participants from the Midlife Development in the United States study (MIDUS II, 2004-2006). LISREL modeling examined causal pathways between elderly demographic characteristics, physical/emotional health, and behavioral and contextual characteristics from an ecological perspective. Data modeling was accomplished using Mplus, PAXW, and SYSTAT statistical software packages. Results indicate that latent factors including older adult health, social isolation of the older adult, and adult child characteristics were significantly associated with elder physical abuse, as mediated by the quality of the elderly parent/adult child relationship. (Contains 4 tables and 1 figure.)

Citation

von Heydrich, L., Schiamberg, L.B. & Chee, G. (2012). Social-Relational Risk Factors for Predicting Elder Physical Abuse: An Ecological Bi-Focal Model. International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 75(1), 71-94. Retrieved January 24, 2022 from .

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