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An Instructional Model for Teaching Literacy: Implications for Instructional Theory
PROCEEDINGS

Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

The purpose of the research reported in this paper was the development of a learner-centered instructional model for the teaching of reading and writing skills. Specifically, the 14 APA (American Psychological Association) learner-centered principles were used as the conceptual framework for the development of the model. There are seven iterative instructional events that comprise the instructional model: (1) establish rapport with the learner; (2) engage in informal conversation; (3) make the transition from informal conversation to structured dialogue; (4) promote awareness of correct spelling and proper sentence structure; (5) facilitate the construction of symbolic knowledge; (6) promote reflection; and (7) encourage the learner to assume higher agency in his or her learning. The model was developed using qualitative methods of research. Fifty elementary school children participated in the study; Bubble Dialogue, a HyperCard application, was used by the children to write stories over a period of 7 months. The paper contains two figures illustrating Bubble Dialogue in use and a diagram of the instructional model. This study promotes a learner-centered paradigm of instruction, one that is fundamentally different from traditional practices, as it places the learner in the center of the learning process and emphasizes meeting individual learning needs at different rates. (Author/DLS)

Citation

Angeli, C. (1998). An Instructional Model for Teaching Literacy: Implications for Instructional Theory. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved February 20, 2020 from .

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