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Variables Affecting University Academic Achievement in a Distance- versus a Conventional Education Setting
PROCEEDINGS

Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate some of the learner variables that may have an influence on university academic achievement in a distance versus a conventional education setting. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyze data by using "Pearson r," and "F-test." Results revealed that the university academic achievement for both types of education has been affected significantly by similar variables, including prior high school academic achievement (a positive correlation), prior high school specialization (in favor of science), and university specialization (in favor of science), and that the gender factor (in favor of females) has significantly affected the university academic achievement in a distance education setting. A second finding was that university achievement in both types of education have not been affected significantly by the variables of locus of control, work responsibility, or the university academic level. According to these results, the researcher recommends that university curriculum planners consider courses in science to be compulsory courses regardless of students' specialization. Such courses are expected to force students to use their mental processes deeply during learning, hence, to enhance their academic achievement. Two figures illustrate conditions that affect learners' academic achievement and variables affecting university academic achievement. Contains 15 references. (Author/DLS)

Citation

Darwazeh, A.N. (1998). Variables Affecting University Academic Achievement in a Distance- versus a Conventional Education Setting. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved April 18, 2021 from .

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