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Open-Ended Learning Environments: A Theoretical Framework and Model for Design
PROCEEDINGS

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Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This paper presents a framework and model for design of open-ended learning environments (OELEs). First, an overview is presented that addresses key characteristics of OELEs, including: use of meaningful, complex contexts; provision of tools and resources; learner reflection and self-monitoring; and social, material, or technological scaffolding. Next, the following assumptions associated with the design of OELEs are discussed: understanding is best achieved when situated in relevant contexts; learners must take more responsibility for monitoring and reflecting upon the learning process; understanding is best supported when learners connect personal experiences with formal concepts; and learning is a byproduct of progressive negotiation and interpretation of meanings. Following establishment of a framework for understanding the challenges and opportunities afforded by OELEs, a theoretical model for designing OELEs is introduced. The following phases and related considerations are described: (1) analysis, including environmental and participant characteristics; (2) design, including objectives, instructional domains, instructional content, means of instruction, and evaluation methods; (3) development and implementation, including resources, and on-going effort; (4) evaluation; and (5) maintenance. Finally, guidelines are offered to assist in use of the model for design and development of learning environments based on open-ended constructs. (Contains 48 references.) (AEF)

Citation

Hill, J.R. & Land, S.M. (1998). Open-Ended Learning Environments: A Theoretical Framework and Model for Design. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved April 20, 2021 from .

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