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Effects of Inductive Multimedia Programs Including Graphs on Creation of Linear Function and Variable Conceptualization
PROCEEDINGS

Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This study examined the effects of an inductive multimedia program, including graphs, on subjects' ability to create linear functions and conceptualize variables from word problems. Subjects were 98 undergraduate students in two sections of a computer literacy course. Students' achievements were assessed via pre- and posttests, which were parallel to the instructional themes stated in the treatment programs. Students were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups to view a version of a self-paced program. Students, regardless of treatment, scored significantly higher on posttest than pretest on both function construction and variable conceptualization. These results may have been influenced by instructional strategies, including: inquiry mathematical thinking, schema training, linked representational systems, and coordinate graph tutorial teaching. Students receiving instruction via the inductive table-and-graph program scored significantly higher on the function construction of the posttest than did students receiving the table-only treatment. Results suggest the use of inductive multimedia program treatments that incorporate many strategies including inquiry learning from data, tutorial, schema, and core representational systems for the problem of translation, specifically creation of linear function. Data specifically suggest that inductive multimedia programs that include the coordinate graph tutorial strategy have a significant effect on the function construction tasks. (Contains 101 references.) (Author/AEF)

Citation

Johari, A. (1998). Effects of Inductive Multimedia Programs Including Graphs on Creation of Linear Function and Variable Conceptualization. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved April 20, 2021 from .

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