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The Role of Awareness of Cognitive Style in Hypermedia
PROCEEDINGS

Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This study examined variables which may be important in the design of instructional environments adapted to accommodate individual differences. Purposes of the study were: (1) to determine whether matching or mismatching subjects with their tendency toward field dependence or field independence had any effect on achievement in a hypermedia learning environment; (2) to determine whether matching or mismatching subjects with their tendency toward field dependence/independence had any effect on satisfaction; (3) to examine the role of awareness of field dependence/independence and the resulting effect on achievement; (4) to examine the role of awareness of field dependence/independence and the effect on satisfaction; and (5) to explore possible interactions of these variables (awareness of cognitive style, field dependence/independence, and match/mismatch) with cognitive style. Students (n=177) enrolled in instructional technology courses were administered the Group Embedded Figures Test to determine field dependence/independence. Half of the students were made aware of their cognitive style. Participants were taught Hypercard, using a treatment that either matched or mismatched their cognitive style, and were then required to complete their own Hypercard stacks. Empirical results indicated that awareness of cognitive style and matching/mismatching with instruction embedded with support for cognitive style did not make a difference for this sample. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/AEF)

Citation

Summerville, J.B. (1998). The Role of Awareness of Cognitive Style in Hypermedia. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved January 18, 2020 from .

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