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New Pathways to a Degree: An Assessment of the Use of Instructional Technologies at Seven Institutions. AIR 1994 Annual Forum Paper
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Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum,

Abstract

This paper examines the design and findings of a survey of 31 faculty and 550 students participating in 7 Annenberg/CPE New Pathways to a Degree electronic learning projects. Each project was selected because it proposed innovative ways to use technology to create new educational opportunities for "new majority learners" (students unable to attend college in conventional ways). All New Pathways courses used technologies in combinations, and communication between students and instructors and among students was supported via several technologies. Survey results indicated that off-campus students found delivery of lectures via video technology (two-way video, one-way video with two-way audio, broadcast video, and videotape) to be acceptable. Students felt that the quality of their mediated interaction with their instructor was as good as or better than experiences in face-to-face classes, and half the students felt that the frequency of their interactions were the same or more frequent. To promote interaction between faculty and students or among students, technologies such as audio-conferencing, electronic mail, or voice mail were more effective than video technologies. Faculty felt that the technologies that let them act the same way they do in face-to-face classes provided the best tools for interaction. The technologies are pushing changes in the relationship among course content, mentor, and student. (Contains 18 references.) (JDD)

Citation

Zuniga, R.E. & Johnstone, S.M. (1994). New Pathways to a Degree: An Assessment of the Use of Instructional Technologies at Seven Institutions. AIR 1994 Annual Forum Paper. Presented at Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum 1994. Retrieved October 20, 2021 from .

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