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The Relationship between Student Perceptions of the Multimedia Classroom and Student Learning Styles
PROCEEDINGS

Eastern Communication Association Annual Meeting,

Abstract

A study explored the extent to which students' learning was facilitated by the use of computerized multimedia presentations in a large lecture course. Subjects, 168 students at a midsize eastern university who enrolled in an introductory mass communication course that used computer assisted media presentations, completed questionnaires about their learning experiences. Results indicated that: (1) learning styles and multimedia presentations were not related; (2) two-thirds of the students reported that they learned more when multimedia was used; (3) virtually all of the remaining one-third of the students were neutral and were evenly distributed across all four learning styles (converger, diverger, assimilator, and accommodator); and (4) 94% of the students reported that the use of multimedia segments made the class entertaining. Findings suggest that the pedagogical benefits of computerized multimedia classroom presentations are equally available to students of all learning styles. (Contains three tables of data.) (RS)

Citation

Pearson, M. (1994). The Relationship between Student Perceptions of the Multimedia Classroom and Student Learning Styles. Presented at Eastern Communication Association Annual Meeting 1994. Retrieved October 16, 2021 from .

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