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Accumulating Gains and Diminishing Risks during the Implementation of Best Practices in a Teacher Education Course
ARTICLE

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Teacher Education Quarterly Volume 32, Number 3, ISSN 0737-5328

Abstract

"Strategies for Effective Elementary Classroom Teaching" is an introductory course offered at the authors' university that impart instructional techniques and management strategies for the elementary classroom. Due to the course's limitations, the authors revised it in two ways: (1) Establish more strongly the connection between theory and practice, and (2) Integrate technology into teaching and learning. In this paper, the authors describe their experiences with the program implementation, report the teacher education candidates' perceptions of the innovations, and provide evidence about the effectiveness of the course. The four research questions included: (1) Is there an identifiable pattern to teacher education candidates' perceptions of an innovation as it is being implemented? (2) What are the concerns that emerge for both candidates and instructors as an innovation is implemented? (3) What is the relationship between the candidates' course evaluations and the innovations implemented by the instructors? and (4) What is the relationship between candidates' perceptions of the course and their concerns? After describing the data collection and analyses procedures, two main findings are discussed. The article concludes with implications of the study. (Contains 3 tables.)

Citation

Olafson, L., Quinn, L.F. & Hall, G.E. (2005). Accumulating Gains and Diminishing Risks during the Implementation of Best Practices in a Teacher Education Course. Teacher Education Quarterly, 32(3), 93-106. Retrieved November 28, 2021 from .

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