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E-Learning as a Tool for Knowledge Transfer through Traditional and Independent Study at Two United Kingdom Higher Educational Institutions: A Case Study
ARTICLE

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E-Learning Volume 4, Number 2, ISSN 1741-8887

Abstract

Much has been made of the advances in computer-aided learning activities. Websites, virtual campus, the increased use of WebCT (an online proprietary virtual learning environment system) and chat rooms and further advances in the use of WebCT are becoming more commonplace in United Kingdom universities. However, the effectiveness of these learning methods from the student point of view needs to be questioned. This article looks for ways of changing higher education students' perception of the usefulness of recommended Internet websites for learning purposes, with the intention of increasing the usage rate of recommended module websites. The change could represent an adaptation of the existing, well-known technology to change students' perception regarding its potentially formative role. Subsequently, the outcomes from this preliminary research could be used in order to enhance the quality of Internet use for teaching and learning purposes. The article further draws on secondary sources, including the 2005 Oxford Internet survey that gives constructive perspectives into future policy direction. The article examines some of the learning technologies and introduces the discussion on the evaluation of web-based learning. The research problem that emerges from the discussion is defined and followed by the illustration of the investigative method deployed. The analysis of findings and recommendations conclude the article. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

Citation

Owens, J.D. & Floyd, D. (2007). E-Learning as a Tool for Knowledge Transfer through Traditional and Independent Study at Two United Kingdom Higher Educational Institutions: A Case Study. E-Learning, 4(2), 172-180. Retrieved January 28, 2020 from .

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