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Cultural Differences in Transactional Distance Preference by Arab and American Distance Learners
ARTICLE

Quarterly Review of Distance Education Volume 11, Number 4, ISSN 1528-3518

Abstract

This study investigated the differences between Arab and American distance learners' preference in the 2 components of transactional distance (structure and interaction) and their relation to learners' self-efficacy and help seeking. The study sample consisted of 95 cases from each group (N = 190). Study results indicated significant differences between Arab and American learners in their preference in the 4 aspects of structure examined. Arab students preferred significantly more rigid structure and a preference for significantly more interaction with their instructors compared to American students. A negative correlation was found between self-efficacy and structure for the American group. For both groups, seeking help was significantly and positively related to preference for interaction with other students. (Contains 4 tables.)

Citation

Al-Harthi, A.S. (2010). Cultural Differences in Transactional Distance Preference by Arab and American Distance Learners. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 11(4), 257-267. Retrieved January 30, 2023 from .

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