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Reflecting on Reflection: Learner Perceptions of Diaries and Blogs in Tertiary Language Study
ARTICLE

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AHHEAIJTRP Volume 10, Number 2, ISSN 1474-0222

Abstract

The use of reflective tasks, such as journals, as a means to enhance learning is not uncommon in higher education. However, the formative value of reflective tasks is not easily reconciled in tertiary settings where assessment requirements traditionally favour product over process. While learner perception and resolution of this tension have rarely been investigated, research confirms that learners' level of engagement with the task is a salient parameter for learning to take place (Platt and Brooks, 2002). In other words, if the task is to serve its formative purpose, learners' perception of and engagement with the task are paramount. The present case study compares learner perceptions of two types of reflective tasks: an online blog and a traditional pen-and-paper learning journal. Findings suggest that reflective tasks can facilitate regular working habits and offer a space for use of the language, and that regular teacher monitoring strongly affects learners' perceptions of the usefulness of the task. (Contains 11 tables.)

Citation

Absalom, M. & De Saint Leger, D. (2011). Reflecting on Reflection: Learner Perceptions of Diaries and Blogs in Tertiary Language Study. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 10(2), 189-211. Retrieved December 3, 2021 from .

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