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Ethics and challenges of databased decision making processes in educational contexts
PROCEEDING

, Yorkville University, Canada ; , National Research Council of Canada, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Amsterdam, Netherlands ISBN 978-1-939797-42-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Heidegger proposed in 1977 that the world was in transition from the modern to the technological way-of-being, in which humans and objects act upon one another in ways that mutually transform their characteristics. At that time technologies were simple and could be classified as tools. Emerging technologies are different. They are complicated assemblages of data and artefacts, and their availability to humans involves models made of multiple algorithms produced by computer scientists. This complicates scrutiny of the tools and assessment of their value to augment the human/technological way-of-being and learning. However, the models can bring interesting developments to the education field for the personalization and filtering of large amounts of data and can help in the management of learning. The challenge is that when analysing the available tools and strategies for filtering and managing the information stream it becomes clear that software and algorithms are not simply lines of code, but that they are shaped by social, political and economic interests that influence their value for learning. The purpose of our research was to critically analyse the ethics of the new developments. Our research shows that the validity of some models proposed does not conform to reality and predictive accuracy, but rather on the usefulness of the technological models proposed. Our research includes concrete examples to highlight the challenges with this approach.

Citation

Kop, R. & Durand, G. (2019). Ethics and challenges of databased decision making processes in educational contexts. In J. Theo Bastiaens (Ed.), Proceedings of EdMedia + Innovate Learning (pp. 754-762). Amsterdam, Netherlands: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 21, 2019 from .