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The effects of schooling and cognitive ability on smoking and marijuana use by young adults
ARTICLE

Economics of Education Review Volume 17, Number 3 ISSN 0272-7757 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

The effects of schooling, cognitive ability, and time preference on the probability that young adults use or smoke marijuana are estimated. It is shown that schooling, cognitive ability, and time preference all affect the likelihood of smoking. Schooling and time preference have modest effects on the use of marijuana when past consumption is not taken into account. Data from the “High School and Beyond 1980: senior cohort third follow-up” report are used. ["JEL" I12]

Citation

Sander, W. The effects of schooling and cognitive ability on smoking and marijuana use by young adults. Economics of Education Review, 17(3), 317-324. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved January 27, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Economics of Education Review on March 1, 2019. Economics of Education Review is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0272-7757(97)00051-4

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