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Nudging study habits: A field experiment on peer tutoring in higher education
ARTICLE

, Department of Economics and School of Public Policy, United States ; , The White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team and Department of Economics, United States

Economics of Education Review Volume 62, Number 1, ISSN 0272-7757 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

More than two of every five students who enroll in college fail to graduate within six years. Peer tutoring offers one approach to improve learning outcomes in higher education. We conducted a randomized controlled experiment designed to increase take-up of university tutoring services. Brief, one-time messages increased tutoring take-up by seven percentage points, or 23% of the control group mean. Attendance at multiple tutoring sessions increased by nearly the same amount, suggesting substantial changes in study habits in response to a simple and inexpensive intervention. The intervention cost $3.32–$14.58 per additional tutoring hour, the lowest reported in the literature on peer tutoring experiments. We find little evidence of advertising-induced tutoring on learning outcomes.

Citation

Pugatch, T. & Wilson, N. (2018). Nudging study habits: A field experiment on peer tutoring in higher education. Economics of Education Review, 62(1), 151-161. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved January 23, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Economics of Education Review on March 1, 2019. Economics of Education Review is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2017.11.003

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