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Selfish learning: The impact of self-referential encoding on children's literacy attainment
ARTICLE

, University of Bristol, United Kingdom ; , University of the West of Scotland, United Kingdom ; , University of Victoria, Canada ; , Open University, United Kingdom ; , City University, United Kingdom ; , University of Abertay Dundee, United Kingdom

Learning and Instruction Volume 40, Number 1, ISSN 0959-4752 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Self-referencing (i.e., thinking about oneself during encoding) can increase attention toward to-be-encoded material, and support memory for information in adults and children. The current inquiry tested an educational application of this ‘self reference effect’ (SRE) on memory. A self-referential modification of literacy tasks (vocabulary spelling) was tested in two experiments. In Experiment 1, seven-to nine-year-old children (

Citation

Turk, D.J., Gillespie-Smith, K., Krigolson, O.E., Havard, C., Conway, M.A. & Cunningham, S.J. (2015). Selfish learning: The impact of self-referential encoding on children's literacy attainment. Learning and Instruction, 40(1), 54-60. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Learning and Instruction on January 29, 2019. Learning and Instruction is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2015.08.001

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