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Recruitment of rural teachers in developing countries: an economic analysis
ARTICLE

TATE Volume 15, Number 8 ISSN 0742-051X Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Monetary and non-monetary incentives for rural teacher recruitment are a prominent feature of developing-country education systems. Despite the widespread use of incentives, there is little theoretical or empirical evidence on their effectiveness. This paper interprets incentive policies within the framework of the economic theory of compensating differentials. The discussion clarifies the implicit assumptions of incentive policies and aids in organizing further empirical work on their effectiveness. Existing evidence on compensating differentials, mainly in the United States, shows that teachers tend to trade off monetary wages against non-monetary aspects of their jobs, such as geographic location and class size.

Citation

McEwan, P.J. Recruitment of rural teachers in developing countries: an economic analysis. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 15(8), 849-859. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved August 10, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies on January 28, 2019. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0742-051X(99)00025-6

Keywords