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Non-Cognitive Factor Relationships to Hybrid Doctoral Student Self-Efficacy
ARTICLE

, , , Trident University International, Cypress, CA, United States ; , Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, Provo, UT, United States

IJWLTT Volume 10, Number 1, ISSN 1548-1093 Publisher: IGI Global

Abstract

Statistical analysis of data gathered from 139 healthcare doctoral students revealed three key findings regarding non-cognitive factor relationships to hybrid doctoral student self-efficacy between online (web-based) and on-campus course components. First, student experiences significantly differed between online and on-campus course components for task value and faculty and peer support. For these factors, on-campus experiences were perceived significantly more positively than online experiences. Secondly, both online and on-campus experiences with task value, faculty and peer support, and boredom and frustration were correlated with self-efficacy: when students experienced high levels of either task value or faculty and peer support, self-efficacy increased; however, when students experienced high levels of boredom and frustration, self-efficacy decreased. Finally, only online task value positively predicted self-efficacy. These findings demonstrated the significant impact of non-cognitive factors on student success and carry implications for successful hybrid teaching and learning. Social cognitive theory provided the framework for the quantitative, non-experimental design.

Citation

Egbert, J., Gomez, F., Li, W. & Pennington, S. (2015). Non-Cognitive Factor Relationships to Hybrid Doctoral Student Self-Efficacy. International Journal of Web-Based Learning and Teaching Technologies, 10(1), 1-13. IGI Global. Retrieved May 12, 2021 from .

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