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Computational Thinking and Teacher Education: Are we there yet?
PROCEEDING

, University of Arizona, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Savannah, GA, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

There is a growing interest in teaching computational thinking (CT) skills to K-12 students so they can be successful in the digital age by becoming competent in everyday computing experiences. After Jeanette Wing’s (2006) seminal article that defined CT as a fundamental skill that should be taught in schools just like reading, writing and arithmetic, various initiatives started in K-12 schools. While most of these initiatives focused on the K-12 students a similar interest should be paid to the teacher education as a central subject matter in helping kids to develop transferable and deeper understanding of CT skills. The question is what advances have been made in teacher education programs since Wing’s call for action to better prepare tomorrow’s teachers. This paper reviews some of the current initiatives that influence teacher education and provides a discussion of issues so both students and teachers could be prepared for computational thinking.

Citation

Czerkawski, B. (2016). Computational Thinking and Teacher Education: Are we there yet?. In G. Chamblee & L. Langub (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 75-78). Savannah, GA, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 19, 2019 from .

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