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Student and In-Service Teachers' Acceptance of Spatial Hypermedia in Their Teaching: The Case of Hypersea
ARTICLE

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Education and Information Technologies Volume 20, Number 3, ISSN 1360-2357

Abstract

The aim of this study was to use the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in order to investigate the factors that influence student and in-service teachers' intention to use a spatial hypermedia application, the HyperSea, in their teaching. HyperSea is a modern hypermedia environment that takes advantage of space in order to display content nodes and social media pages that can be dragged from the Internet. In total, 257 student and in-service teachers completed a survey questionnaire, measuring their responses to four constructs in the TAM. The results of student teachers' regression analysis showed that all components of the TAM were found to predict their intention to use HyperSea in their teaching. Perceived usefulness was the most important predictor in their attitude and intention. On the other hand, only attitude towards use had direct influence on teachers' intention. In addition, perceived usefulness influenced teachers' intention. Perceived ease of use in this study failed to emerge as a significant predictor of teachers' attitude and perceived usefulness. The results showed that the TAM in general is useful model for predicting and exploring the factors that influence student and in-service teachers' intention to use spatial hypermedia such as the HyperSea in their teaching in future. Results of the study are discussed in terms of increasing the intention of student and in service teachers to use spatial hypermedia in their teaching.

Citation

Koutromanos, G., Styliaras, G. & Christodoulou, S. (2015). Student and In-Service Teachers' Acceptance of Spatial Hypermedia in Their Teaching: The Case of Hypersea. Education and Information Technologies, 20(3), 559-578. Retrieved August 11, 2020 from .

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