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The intellectual property debate in e-learning under Articles 7(1) and 8 of the Berne Convention: Bridging gaps between information technology, societal demands, and the law
THESIS

, University of Strathclyde , United Kingdom

University of Strathclyde . Awarded

Abstract

This study observes the issue of existing gaps in the practical deployment of copyright and the fair use of information as identified in the Berne Convention articles 7(1) and 8, in the e-learning environment. This author examines the portrayal of a moral ideal, as an ultimate scholarly goal, thus, expressing intellectual and moral values. Since the goal of this research is centred on the perspective of e-learning students around the debate of copyright and the fair use of information, this author had to define and present the conditions, which made the scenario possible. She also defined and presented the kind of premises and values that created the circumstances and motivated the actions of people, which means that she had to define and present a rational code of ethics. The objective of this study is to continue the IP debate in the light of two cardinal reasons, namely, the confirmation of existing copyright legislation, proclaiming that, “the notion of author constitutes the privileged moment of individualization in the history of ideas, knowledge, literature, philosophy, and the sciences” (Foucault, 1980, cited in Irvin, 2002, p. 9). In addition, this author wanted to demonstrate how much would be possible if everyone made an effort to truly understanding the values and ethics behind copyright procedures.

Citation

Fismer, E.C. The intellectual property debate in e-learning under Articles 7(1) and 8 of the Berne Convention: Bridging gaps between information technology, societal demands, and the law. Master's thesis, University of Strathclyde. Retrieved February 5, 2023 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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