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Student self-efficacy in online instruction in a lower division history course
DISSERTATION

, Arizona State University, United States

Arizona State University . Awarded

Abstract

There has been a phenomenal growth in the number of university courses being offered entirely online. The popularity of online courses has accordingly become popular with students and enrollments in online courses have increased at a much higher proportion than similar courses taught in traditional face-to-face classrooms. However, with this high increase of enrollments there is a disproportionate level of students not completing courses or, in many cases, not achieving passing grades. This study examines students enrolled in a History of Western Civilization course with regard to their attitudes, anxieties, and self-efficacy about computers and technology. Two different semesters of the same class were surveyed. The results of this study indicated that low student self-efficacy in several areas was associated with students who did not finish the course.

Citation

Bercu, W.M. Student self-efficacy in online instruction in a lower division history course. Ph.D. thesis, Arizona State University. Retrieved July 23, 2021 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords