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Brick, click, or brick and click: A comparative study on the effectiveness of content delivery modalities for working adults
DISSERTATION

, Touro University International, United States

Touro University International . Awarded

Abstract

There is a strong economic incentive for business to embrace online learning. In the United States, private industry spends billions of dollars on training and education. Given the strategic importance of knowledge transfer to working adults, organizational leaders need evidence and support that various learning technologies are effective content delivery modalities for learning organizations. A new trend in adult education and training is hybrid or blended content delivery. Blended content delivery promises convenience and learning efficiencies, because the pedagogical model incorporates attributes preferred by adult learners: access and social interaction. This study focuses on a particular group of working adults engaged in education and learning via classroom, online, and blended content delivery modalities. Blended content delivery is compared to classroom instruction, and a select form of asynchronous, online learning.

Six hypotheses were developed to explore participant reaction and achievement in the blended versus classroom and online instructional modalities. This study applied Kirkpatrick's levels of training analysis to determine knowledge acquisition. The sample population included undergraduate and graduate working adult students in economics and general courses. Statistical analysis suggest no significant differences between blended and classroom content delivery modalities. As for blended instruction versus asynchronous online content delivery, statistical significance in favor of online content delivery was partially supported.

Citation

Banks, L.V. Brick, click, or brick and click: A comparative study on the effectiveness of content delivery modalities for working adults. Ph.D. thesis, Touro University International. Retrieved July 27, 2021 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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