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Being There: Task Complexity Influence on Presence in Three-Dimensional Virtual Environments
THESIS

, University of Calgary , Canada

University of Calgary . Awarded

Abstract

This two-phased, mixed methods study investigated the effect of levels of task complexity on presence in a virtual environment. Building on Wood's model of task complexity and on Kopp's contextual factors, three levels of objective complexity were systematically developed for job interview tasks. After phase 1, Education students were randomly assigned to complete one interview task at one complexity level. They were videotaped, and surveyed about their sense of presence. While ANOVA showed there were no significant differences in presence across the three groups, regression showed that age and complexity predicted presence. The qualitative themes such as involvement, suspension of disbelief, navigation, and task complexity shed light on the contributing factors that influenced participants' presence. Participants identified involvement, presence, and interaction as essential characteristics to perform a learning task in a VE. The results of this study contributed to understand presence and it's influence on learning in 3D VEs.

Citation

Alamri, J.M. Being There: Task Complexity Influence on Presence in Three-Dimensional Virtual Environments. Master's thesis, University of Calgary. Retrieved July 27, 2021 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords