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The absence of technology in undergraduate sport management curriculum and its relationship to intercollegiate and professional athletics
DISSERTATION

, Robert Morris University, United States

Robert Morris University . Awarded

Abstract

The delivery of sports to the average fan has changed dramatically over the last 10 years. A sporting contest once heard only on a radio can now be experienced by watching a high definition television in the comfort of one's own living room or viewing the game on the Internet. Thus, the enhancement of sports technology has allowed fans to gain instant access to score results on their telephone, view their favorite games online, and bring a new level of fan interaction to the game via personal digital assistants (Personal Digital Assistant, 2008).

Those who aspire to work in the sports profession often pursue a degree in sport management. Advancements in how teams are marketed, scores are reported, or athletes are tracked have taken the role of an athletic administrator to a new level. Still, the way educators train the sport management major has remained unchanged in regards to technology requirements. Standards set by the Sport Management Program Review Council (SMPRC) outline the expectations for students in an approved sport management program (Sport, 2000). Though 12 standards outline the requirements for the students, only the “communication in sport” standard specifically addresses technology within the undergraduate sport management program curriculum (Sport, 2000).

A mixed methods research design was used to analyze 183 undergraduate sport management programs through a quantitative survey. Eight sport management program directors or designees were interviewed through a qualitative interview. The results indicated students had technology competencies in areas of e-mail, Microsoft applications, and mass communication. These common technologies were already available to students on their campus. Current technologies used in the sporting industry were not being addressed in undergraduate sport management programs.

Citation

Hjerpe, K.L. The absence of technology in undergraduate sport management curriculum and its relationship to intercollegiate and professional athletics. Ph.D. thesis, Robert Morris University. Retrieved July 29, 2021 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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