You are here:

Delivery of public information and marketing curriculum based on self directed readiness and learning style for Arizona's rural communication managers
DISSERTATION

, Arizona State University, United States

Arizona State University . Awarded

Abstract

This research measures learning styles and readiness for self directed learning for town managers in rural Arizona via Kolb's Learning Style Inventory and Guglielmino's Self Directed Learning Readiness Survey. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of the learning style and readiness for self directed learning relative to the demographic profile of the study population and to make specific recommendations about practicable alternatives for Public Information and Marketing curriculum delivery based on available resources and learning styles. The end result of incorporating all the physiological, psychological, and environmental factors into curriculum and instructional delivery methods is Arizona's public administration educators have the tools to ensure efficient allocation of time and resources for the student, department and university. A paradoxical result of the research determined Arizona's rural public administrators are capable of self directed, distance learning endeavors as determined by the Self Directed Learning Readiness Survey however most would be unlikely to undertake them based on the results of the Learning Style Inventory. Recommended solutions include developing partnerships between Arizona's major universities and rural community colleges, used of shared professors among Arizona's major universities and a hybrid of classroom and distance instructional delivery.

Citation

Collins, M.P. Delivery of public information and marketing curriculum based on self directed readiness and learning style for Arizona's rural communication managers. Ph.D. thesis, Arizona State University. Retrieved August 2, 2021 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords