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Engaging with Cross-Cultural Communication Barriers in Globalized Higher Education: The Case of Research-Degree Students
ARTICLE

Intercultural Education Volume 20, Number 5, ISSN 1467-5986

Abstract

Problematic aspects of intercultural communication are considered in the context of: an increasingly internationalized market for higher education; the globalization of knowledge; the compatibility of distinct national higher education cultures; and the capacity for successful cross-cultural cooperation. This is exemplified by reference to a doctoral programme delivered by a UK-based university, largely through distance learning, to students resident in a non-anglophone country. Here, the challenges have concerned: cultural and linguistic barriers; the use of distance-based supervision; and taken-for-granted knowledge related to learning and academic levels. Anecdotal evidence suggests diverse student experiences during the supervision process, in both face-to-face and distance learning contexts, reflecting the extent of familiarity with idiomatic and technical English, and the importance of non-verbal communication. Given unequal power relations between students and university teachers, improved intercultural communicative competence may be achieved through a mutual construction of a discursive arena reflecting the dynamics of an increasingly globalized structure of academic intercourse. This may involve a critique of assumptions associated with "national" academic cultures together with a pragmatic quest for a common lexicon. This in turn may contribute to the process of cross-national collaboration and cooperation in higher education.

Citation

Bash, L. (2009). Engaging with Cross-Cultural Communication Barriers in Globalized Higher Education: The Case of Research-Degree Students. Intercultural Education, 20(5), 475-483. Retrieved December 3, 2021 from .

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