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Online Military Training: Using a Social Cognitive View of Motivation and Self-Regulation to Understand Students' Satisfaction, Perceived Learning, and Choice
ARTICLE

Quarterly Review of Distance Education Volume 8, Number 3, ISSN 1528-3518

Abstract

Using a social cognitive framework, the present study investigated the relations between two motivational constructs, prior experience, and several adaptive outcomes. Participants (n = 204) completed a survey that assessed their perceived task value, self-efficacy, prior experience, and a collection of outcomes that included their satisfaction, perceived learning, and intentions to enroll in future online courses (choice behaviors). Results indicate that task value, self-efficacy, and prior experience with online learning were significantly related to positive outcomes. Additionally, results from several independent sample t tests indicate that students reporting on a course they chose to take exhibited significantly higher mean scores on task value, satisfaction, perceived learning, and choice behaviors than students reporting on a required course. Educational implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. (Contains 3 tables.)

Citation

Artino, A.R. (2007). Online Military Training: Using a Social Cognitive View of Motivation and Self-Regulation to Understand Students' Satisfaction, Perceived Learning, and Choice. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 8(3), 191-202. Retrieved July 2, 2022 from .

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