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Technoethics and Emergency Remote Education: Addressing the (In)Justice of Google Classroom
PROCEEDING

, Iowa State University, United States ; , Loyola University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Online, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-55-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Our study investigated how Google Meet and Google Classroom embed beliefs about schools, knowledge, privilege, and pedagogy into their design. Using a conceptual framework of the technoethical audit, we found these technologies help perpetuate and reproduce injustice. Google limited meaningful educational interaction, envisioning students as technology users with little agency or control. It predisposed students to unnecessary practices of surveillance and monitoring, all while subjecting them to regimes of data collection and sharing for corporate profit. While many critical scholars have long noted the systemic injustices embedded in public schooling, the stressor of the global pandemic spotlighted these injustices. We contend that the technologies used (or not) during remote teaching have further exacerbated existing injustices. Finally, we make recommendations to improve remote learning: teach the crisis; implement project-based learning; and investigate experiences with technology.

Citation

Gleason, B. & Heath, M. (2021). Technoethics and Emergency Remote Education: Addressing the (In)Justice of Google Classroom. In E. Langran & L. Archambault (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1226-1235). Online, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 30, 2021 from .