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Promoting Scholarly Conversations among in-Service Teachers in an Online Graduate Program
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, Minnesota State University, Mankato, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Washington, D.C., United States ISBN 978-1-939797-32-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

To enhance the rigor of collaborative learning, we have designed Scholarly Conversations based on the knowledge building principles (Scardamalia & Bereiter, 2006) and implemented them in a graduate course which supports k12 teachers' professional development. During the 6-week course, students were divided into groups and were required to complete two Scholarly Conversations. A high performing group who demonstrated success on Scholarly Conversations was selected for this study. A coding scheme, developed from preliminarily studies (Cai, 2017a & 2017b), was applied to analyze the data generated from this group in order to determine the extent to which the students were engaged in Scholarly Conversations and to identify the strategies they used for collaboration, as well as whether the patterns of their conversations, if any, evolved over time. Empirical evidence generated from this study will increase our understanding of how k12 teachers interact with each other in an online graduate course, and therefore, have implications for designing online environments that promote collaboration among k12 teachers.

Citation

Cai, Q. (2018). Promoting Scholarly Conversations among in-Service Teachers in an Online Graduate Program. In E. Langran & J. Borup (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 104-109). Washington, D.C., United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 21, 2019 from .

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