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Teaching as design: Implications for learning to teach with technology
PROCEEDINGS

, , Michigan State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-44-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Teachers, particularly those working with technology, have to deal with the issue of design. However, it is often hard to describe what design means. This paper offers an analytic framework for better understanding the process of design and comparing it to the kinds of activities that are involved in teaching. We do this by looking at case studies of design as instantiated in a Master's seminar in Educational Technology. Participants in this class were expected not only to learn interactive web-based technology but also to generate abstract knowledge (about designing educational technology) through working on authentic design projects. In this paper we look closely at the design process and compare it to the process of teaching. Our analysis is guided by prior work on the analysis of design conducted by Mishra et. al. (1999). We believe that a better understanding of design can enrich our understanding of both teaching and technology taken individually, as well as offer us new ways of teaching with and about technology.

Citation

Wallace, R. & Mishra, P. (2002). Teaching as design: Implications for learning to teach with technology. In D. Willis, J. Price & N. Davis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2002--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2506-2510). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 20, 2019 from .

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