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Indian Journal of Open Learning

2000 Volume 9, Number 2

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Table of Contents

Number of articles: 15

  1. Democratizina Education for the Professional Development of Change Agents through Distance Education Process : The Case of Lesotho

    Dele Braimoh & H. Lephota, Institute of Extra-mural Studies National University of Lesotho, Southern Africa

    Despite the myopic and suspicious views by many novices regarding the quality of distance education products who unfortunately are regarded as inferio , compared to the products of the conventional... More

    pp. 131-146

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  2. Professional Development in Distance Education: Knowledge Advantage, Conflicting Values and the Struggle for Survival

    Gordon Burt, Institute of Educational Technology, Open University, United Kingdom

    There are a number of possible ways in which development can happen: solitary, peer or developer-led development; and learning-by-doing or learning-todo. Developer-led learning-to-do fails to... More

    pp. 147-156

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  3. Professional Development in Distance Education: A Case Study of Distance Education Programme of District Primary Education Programme

    Shabnam Sinha, DEP-DPEP Indira Gandhi National Open University

    Professional development of distance education personnel undertaken by DEP-DPEP has been primarily with the airn of supplementing face-to-face training of teachers with multi-media support. This... More

    pp. 157-164

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  4. Using Action Research for Professional Development

    B.K. Passi, Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya, Indore

    The author discusses various models of staff development; andproposes action research as a mechanism for continuing professional development. More

    pp. 165-168

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  5. Distance Education and Human Resource Development

    S.S Sreekumar, J. N. Govt College, Port Blair

    The present study reports the findings of a sunley undertaken by the author on a sample of 50 graduates of IGNOU belonging to Andaman & Nicobar Islands regarding the contribution of DE to skill... More

    pp. 169-178

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  6. Recruitment and Selection Process in Human Resource Management - A Case Study of Bangladesh Open University

    M.D. Abu Taher & Kamrul Arefin, Bangladesh Open University

    With the passage of time, the importance of human factor in theaccomplishment of organisational objectives has increased considerably because of increasing competition and globalisation of... More

    pp. 179-190

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  7. Problems Experienced by Female Distance Education Students of IGNOU: Why Do Some Consider Dropping Out While Others Decide To Stay?

    Margaret Taplin

    This study investigated factors that caused women students to consider dropping out of distance education studies. Results from questionnaires and interviews from female students at Indira Gandhi... More

    pp. 191-210

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  8. Problems Experienced by Female Distance Education Students at IGNOU: Why do Some Consider Dropping Out While Others Decide to Stay?

    Margaret Taplin, The Open University of Hong Kong. Hong Kong, SAR China, Hong Kong

    The purpose of the project was to investigate factors that can cause women students to consider dropping out their distance education studies. Data were collected from a sample of 50 female... More

    pp. 191-210

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  9. Composition, Problems and Motivating Factors of Correspondence Course Students

    S.P Gupta, ICC & CE, University of'Allahahad

    In this study ttte author discusses the factors wttlch motivate students to opt for correspondence courses ofAllahabad University. The paper also discusses the problems faced by the students while ... More

    pp. 211-216

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  10. Estimation of Study Hours in Relation to Selected Courses in the PGDE Programme of the OUSL

    Chandra Gunawardena & G. Dayalathalekamge, Open University of Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka

    In distance education, the academic worth of courses and programmes of study are denoted by their credit rating. Yet the method of estimating the credit rating may differ from institution to... More

    pp. 217-228

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  11. Multimedia Network for Distance Education in Papua New Guinea

    Andrew Nyondo & Atawe Koigiri, Papua New Guinea University of Technology, Papua New Guinea

    The Depattment of Open and Distance Learning at the Papua New Guinea University of Technology offers two programmes through the distance mode -a Matriculation programme and a Diploma in Commerce... More

    pp. 229-236

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  12. Analyzing the Quality in the Design of Education of I~~ternational Virtual Graduate Programs: A New Model of Evaluation

    Yolanda Gayol, World Bank, Washington DC, USA, United States

    This study presents a Model to explore the design of international virtual graduate programs, grounded in the theory of distance education. Through this Model, large volumes of information... More

    pp. 237-250

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  13. Analysing the Quality in the Design of Education of International Virtual Graduate Programs: A New Model of Evaluation

    Yolanda Gayol

    This study presents a model to explore the design of international virtual graduate programs, grounded in the theory of distance education. Results provide initial evidence suggesting that this new... More

    pp. 237-49

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  14. A Concept Design for Strengthening Learning Support

    Pankaj Khare, Indira Gandhi National Open University, New Delhi

    The author describes types and functions of student contact points in distance education; proposes a contouring and catchment method, and applies the method to IGNOU for strengthening its learner... More

    pp. 251-260

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  15. A Concept Design for Strengthening Learner Support

    Pankaj Khare

    Describes types and functions of student contact points in distance education, including academic counseling and library services; proposes a contouring and catchment method to determine the... More

    pp. 251-60

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