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The Use and Effects of Web-Based Instruction: Evidence From a Single-Source Study
Article

, , , City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Journal of Interactive Learning Research Volume 11, Number 2, ISSN 1093-023X Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Although Web-based instruction (WBI) has been widely herald-ed for its effective, efficient, and enjoyable functions for teaching and learning, there is little solid evidence for the effectiveness of WBI on learning outcomes. The problem lies in part in the im-precise and insensitive research methods used in WBI research. The current study employed a single-source method that was originally used in advertising research to test the impact of WBI on learning. The test data came from a sample of 90 freshmen university students taking a Modern Physics course. The log file of WebCT, a Web-based instructional package, provided mea-sures of Web use behavior whereas exam scores constitute mea-sures of learning outcome. A baseline survey provided four sets of variables for control purpose. Multiple regression analyses re-vealed strong evidence that use of relevant World Wide Web (Web) content does improve learning significantly. Equally inter-esting was the finding that surfing of irrelevant content on the Web actually impedes learning. Implications for the design and implementation of WBI are discussed.

Citation

ZHU, J.J.H., STOKES, M. & Lu, A.X.Y. (2000). The Use and Effects of Web-Based Instruction: Evidence From a Single-Source Study. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 11(2), 197-218. Charlottesville, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 27, 2020 from .

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  • Humanities in the Cyber-Age

    Susan Copeland Henry, Clayton College and State University, United States

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