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Virtual Classrooms for Student-Centered Learning in the UAE: A Qualitative Exploratory Study PROCEEDINGS

, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Montréal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-98-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

In the educational context, computer technology’s introduction has supported existing delivery strategies and resulted in the emergence of new forms within distance education (DE). Blended learning is a popular new mode and is a hybrid between classroom instruction and DE. In the UAE, blended learning is gaining attention especially with one of the newer Universities offering its programs with such a delivery mode. Instruction depends on the use of synchronous virtual classrooms (VC) in combination with face-to-face sessions, and asynchronous self-study sessions. The paper presents the findings of a qualitative research study, where 18 graduate students attending the blended-learning university were interviewed to have a deeper understanding of their perceptions about advantages of the used VC (WIMBA). Interviews also probed their opinions and suggestions about challenges they are facing and how to best design online activities to involve them and increase their online interactivity

Citation

Tamim, R. (2012). Virtual Classrooms for Student-Centered Learning in the UAE: A Qualitative Exploratory Study. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2012--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 1 (pp. 1324-1330). Montréal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 22, 2018 from .

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