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Enhancing Online and Face-to-Face Teaching with Social Networking Sites and Digital Literacy Activities
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, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada ; , , Memorial University, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Montréal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-98-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This paper discusses efforts to enhance classroom relations, learning climate and understanding of the pedagogical possibilities of digital technologies, both online and face-to-face, with social networking sites. The case study of the online course, which was offered to graduate students who were mostly teachers, discusses the use of an Elgg to supplement an online course created in Desire2Learn. In the second case study, where the undergraduate course was offered face-to-face, Edmodo was used as a teaching tool and social networking space. Data in these case studies come from various sources: student course evaluations (CEQs), the social networking sites themselves (with ethical consent), a survey about Elgg use, and a TPACK survey (see www.tpck.org ). These data were analyzed to reveal attitudes toward the social networking sites, uses the students made of them, and students’ self-reported technological, pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) and its intersections.

Citation

Hammett, R., St. Croix, L. & Wicks, C. (2012). Enhancing Online and Face-to-Face Teaching with Social Networking Sites and Digital Literacy Activities. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2012--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 1 (pp. 1036-1041). Montréal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 21, 2019 from .

Keywords

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