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Technology Applications for Students with Disabilities: Tools to Access Curriculum Content
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, Arizona State University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Lisbon, Portugal ISBN 978-1-880094-89-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Technology provides tools to access curriculum content for students with disabilities. This paper reviews the legal definition of Assistive Technology (AT) in the United States and regulations regarding its use. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and Differentiated Instruction (DI) are presented as planning frameworks for technology integration. Suggestions are given for customizing software commonly found in K-12 schools that could be used in an assistive and instructional manner, and features from specialized software are discussed. Procedures are given for obtaining and creating digital text, and instructional uses for promising new technology and hand held devices are reviewed. Web 2.0 tools are discussed in relation to developing collaborative skills, and suggested sites suitable for K-12 schools are noted.

Citation

Puckett, K. (2011). Technology Applications for Students with Disabilities: Tools to Access Curriculum Content. In T. Bastiaens & M. Ebner (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2011--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3186-3191). Lisbon, Portugal: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 24, 2019 from .

Keywords

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