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Preservice Social Studies Teachers’ Historical Thinking and Digitized Primary Sources: What They Use and Why
ARTICLE

, , The University of Texas at Austin, United States ; , unknown, United States

CITE Journal Volume 11, Number 2, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

In this qualitative case study the authors explored secondary social studies preservice teachers’ abilities to discern the digitized primary resources available to them for historical thinking instruction. The emerging analysis highlights the development of these young teachers’ knowledge and understandings of digitized resources as they relate to historical thinking via a pragmatic meter and their pedagogical content knowledge. Using the teacher cognition scholarship of Shulman (2004), the study suggests that the preservice teachers’ enumerated knowledge sources are vital in tracing teachers' decisions.

Citation

Salinas, C., Bellows, M.E. & Liaw, H.L. (2011). Preservice Social Studies Teachers’ Historical Thinking and Digitized Primary Sources: What They Use and Why. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 11(2), 184-204. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Technological Modeling: Faculty Use of Technologies in Preservice Teacher Education from 2004 to 2012

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    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 16, No. 2 (June 2016) pp. 184–207

  2. A Year of Reflection: The More Things Change

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These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.