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The Effect of Social Presence on Language Learning: A Comparison between Face-to-Face Conversation and Videoconferencing
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, The University of Tokyo, Japan ; , Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, HI, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-73-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of social presence on learner-centered communicative language learning. Social presence is the “the ability of participants in a community of inquiry to project them solve socially and emotionally, as ’real’ people”, as defined by Garrison et al, (2004). We compared videoconferencing and face-to-face communication in English as an experimental study from the viewpoints of three features: perceived learning consciousness, perceived social presence, and learning performance. The results show that learners using videoconferencing software were significantly more conscious of the target expressions and uttered the target expression more frequently. On the other hand, face-to-face communication has a main effect on the enhancement of active communication from the viewpoint of social presence. Learners in face-to-face communication spoke significantly more, but also uttered native language more often than those using videoconferencing software.

Citation

Yamada, M. & Akahori, K. (2009). The Effect of Social Presence on Language Learning: A Comparison between Face-to-Face Conversation and Videoconferencing. In G. Siemens & C. Fulford (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2009--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 711-720). Honolulu, HI, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 23, 2019 from .

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