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Pre-Service Elementary Teachers Planning for Math Instruction: Use of Technology Tools
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, , George Mason University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Pre-service teachers find themselves situated within a potentially technology-rich environment for mathematical learning. This article summarizes the results of a study with 14 pre-service teachers who designed a lesson plan integrating a technology tool. Results of the study suggest that pre-service teachers’ selection of technology tools tended to center around those tools they found to be fun, engaging, and motivating, rather than tools which promoted conceptual learning. Results also showed that not all pre-service teachers took advantage of the affordances of technology tools for mathematical learning. Implications for teacher educators are discussed.

Citation

Johnston, C. & Suh, J. (2009). Pre-Service Elementary Teachers Planning for Math Instruction: Use of Technology Tools. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3561-3566). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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Cited By

  1. A Framework For Examining Teachers’ Noticing Of Mathematical Cognitive Technologies

    Ryan Smith, Dongjo Shin & Somin Kim, University of Georgia, United States

    Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching Vol. 36, No. 1 (January 2017) pp. 41–63

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