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Enhancing TPACK with Assistive Technology: Promoting Inclusive Practices in Pre-service Teacher Education
Article

, , , Washington State University, United States

CITE Journal Volume 9, Number 2, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

As the global community continues the transition from an industrialized factory model to an information and now participatory networked-based society, educational technology will play a pivotal role in preparing students for their futures. Many teacher preparation programs are failing to provide preservice teachers with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to adopt and utilize technology effectively. This paper presents an enhanced technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge (TPACK) model that adds assistive technology as a means to promote inclusive educational practice for preservice teachers. This model offers substantive promise for improving learning outcomes for students with disabilities and other traditionally marginalized populations who receive the majority of their classroom instruction in general education settings. This paper extends the TPACK model by providing specific examples of how assistive technology and instructional technology are distinct yet overlapping constructs. Essential technology skills for preservice teachers and strategies supporting inclusive educational practice are identified.

Citation

Marino, M., Sameshima, P. & Beecher, C. (2009). Enhancing TPACK with Assistive Technology: Promoting Inclusive Practices in Pre-service Teacher Education. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 9(2), 186-207. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 25, 2019 from .

Keywords

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These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.