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GeoThentic: Designing and Assessing with Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge
Article

, , , University of Minnesota, United States ; , University of Manchester, United Kingdom

CITE Journal Volume 9, Number 3, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

GeoThentic, an online teaching and learning environment, focuses on engaging teachers and learners in solving real-world geography problems through use of geospatial technologies. The design of GeoThentic is grounded on the technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge (TPACK) framework as a metacognitive tool. This paper describes how the TPACK framework has informed the authors’ design endeavors and how a set of assessment models within GeoThentic can be used to assess teachers' TPACK.

Citation

Doering, A., Scharber, C., Miller, C. & Veletsianos, G. (2009). GeoThentic: Designing and Assessing with Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 9(3), 316-336. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 23, 2019 from .

Keywords

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