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Blended Learning Initiatives in Higher Education: Opportunities and Challenges PROCEEDINGS

, , Portland State University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-62-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to describe the process and goals of the blended learning initiative that Portland State University began in the fall of 2006 and share the lessons and insights that we have gained from this experience. Portland State University planned and initiated a pilot project to test a process for course conversion (e.g., from a traditional classroom course to a blended course format). We will present the process for the blended course design and ho we developed a community of mutual support. Moreover, we will share both opportunities and challenges that we faced in implementing blended courses. We will discuss how the blended learning initiative can present the university with an opportunity to improve student learning and the effectiveness in delivering instruction. We will also discuss the challenges that need to be addressed when implementing blended learning from teaching, learning, and administrative perspectives and how we addressed such issues.

Citation

Chamberlain, M. & Reynolds, C. (2007). Blended Learning Initiatives in Higher Education: Opportunities and Challenges. In C. Montgomerie & J. Seale (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2007--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 2397-2402). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 22, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Blended Learning: An Asian Perspective

    Raymond Tham, University of Newcastle, Australia; Lesley Tham, Stirling University, UK, Singapore

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 684–691

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