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Fostering Creativity in a Qualitative Research Course Using BlackBoard with a Blended Learning Approach: Best Practices.
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, Tecnológico de Monterrey, ITESM-CCM, Mexico

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-62-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Presenting a higher education case study from Mexico City on how to teach a undergraduate qualitative research course using online and e-learning technology (via BlackBoard) and face-to-face instruction, to foster creativity within the process of learning acquisition of qualitative research methodology tools (to gather and analyze qualitative data). A Blended Learning approach was used to delivery and to teach this course. The intention of this paper presentation is comment on the best teaching practices and strategies used to make meaningful the learning process of a highly complicated issues related to qualitative theories and paradigms (e.g., ethno-methodology, naturalistic inquiry, constructivism, and so on)- to undergraduate students at university level. “Blended Learning” is widely used nowadays in many higher education institutions; qualitative research courses do not escape from this trend, and they must be addressed in the best way to overcome the distance education technology interface and interaction problems.

Citation

Mortera-Gutiérrez, F. (2007). Fostering Creativity in a Qualitative Research Course Using BlackBoard with a Blended Learning Approach: Best Practices. In C. Montgomerie & J. Seale (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2007--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1678-1683). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 19, 2018 from .

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